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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 293-295

Prevalence of abnormal semen analysis in patients of infertility in a rural setup at Tiwsa Tehsil District, Amravati (Maharashtra): An observational study


1 Department of Rognidan and Vikrity Vigyan, Shri Gurudeo Ayurved College, Gurukunj Ashram, Amravati, Maharashtra, India
2 Department of Prasuti Tantra and Streerog, Shri Gurudeo Ayurved College, Gurukunj Ashram, Amravati, Maharashtra, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Nandkishor Bhaurao Kale
Department of Rognidan and Vikrity Vigyan, Shri Gurudeo Ayurved College, Gurukunj Ashram, Amravati, Maharashtra.
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JISM.JISM_79_20

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Background: Semen is produced in the testicles and stored in the seminal vesicles, which contribute to 50% of the semen volume. Semen or seminal fluid contains sperms. Sperms are capable of fertilizing female ova. The climax of sexual excitement, that is, orgasm, in the male is accompanied by the discharge of semen. Semen analysis is important to evaluate the infertility in male partners. It provides the direction to determine the prevalence of abnormal semen parameters in our environment. Materials and Methods: Women who experienced childlessness were examined in the department of Streerog and Prasutitantra with diagnosis of primary infertility. Semen samples of 212 men aged 20–45 years were collected at Shri Gurudeo Ayurved Hospital, Gurukunj Ashram. Semen analysis of the same male partners was done for volume, sperm count, and motility according to the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines for semen analysis. This study was conducted in the pathology laboratory of the Department of Rognidan and Vikrity Vigyan at Shri Gurudeo Ayurved Hospital, Gurukunj Ashram. Results: Overall, 8% cases of azoospermia and 30% incidence of abnormal semen quality behind male infertility was noted. Conclusion: The current study data also match with the WHO incidence data regarding male infertility in a rural setup. The exact and early causes of azoospermia need to be corrected and managed. Also, there is a need to correct the rare causes of male infertility related to semen, even though the percentage of the same may be low. The role of male partners in infertility needs more significant research work to be conducted.


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